Snapchat survived its rocky starts to now be on the verge of a $20 billion IPO. Here’s the story of Snapchat and how Snapchat went from a million-dollar idea to the company called Snap today.

story of snapchat
Snapchat logo

Once upon a time, a young Evan Spiegel from Los Angeles and his buddy Reginald (Reggie) Brown, decided to join Kappa Sigma fraternity. That marks the beginning of the story of Snapchat.

Snapchat wasn’t Spiegel’s first startup. Murphy had recruited Spiegel, to help with an idea. In 2010, they launched Future-freshman, a site meant to make applying to college simpler.

It wasn’t until Spiegel’s junior year that the idea for Snapchat was born. “I wish these photos I am sending this girl would disappear,” Brown told Spiegel in April 2011. His friend got excited about the concept of disappearing photos and told Brown that this was FAB idea. Five years later, that idea would now be worth billions. WELL, A GIRL IS ALWAYS THE REASON FOR A SUCCESSFUL MAN.

Journey from Pica boo to Snapchat

story of snapchat
Snapchat founders: Evan Spiegel and Reginald Brown

Snapchat was born — except it wasn’t called Snapchat at first. When it launched in the App Store, it was called Pica boo- CUTE GHOST WHICH VANISHED PICTURES INTO THIN AIR.

But Pica boo failed miserably. By the end of the summer, it only had 127 users. Then Brown, Spiegel, and Murphy had a fight over the startup’s ownership. It ended up in Spiegel smashing the phone and freezing Brown out of all the startup’s accounts.

But later, by spring 2012, the app that once had just over 100 users now had 100,000 daily active users.

Surprisingly by the end of 2012, Snapchat had hit a million daily active users.

That’s when Facebook gave Snapchat an unexpected present. In December 2012, it launched its own Snapchat competitor, Poke.

In February 2013, Reggie Brown — the guy who came up with the idea sued Murphy, Spiegel, and Snapchat for cutting him out of the business. However, it didn’t stop the users from clicking pictures with out of the box virtual props. This isn’t the end of the story of Snapchat.

Snapchat’s fast rise soon gained the attention of Mark Zuckerberg. The Facebook CEO came to Evan Spiegel with an offer: $3 billion for the company. Spiegel famously played hard to catch before turning Facebook down. Well played Mr Spiegel!

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